Blog

What is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur when you have diabetes. It affects mostly the feet and legs first, but can also affect the hands and arms. If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can develop serious complications, including limb loss, hypoglycemia, low blood pressure and joint deterioration. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy The most common form of diabetic neuropathy is called peripheral neuropathy. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are worse at night and may include: Numbness or temperature changes Tingling or burning sensations in the extremities Sharp pains or cramps in the extremities Increased and extreme sensitivity
Read More

What is Atrial Fibrillation?

Affecting more than three million Americans every year, atrial fibrillation (also called afib) is a common form of arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) that can significantly affect many areas of your body, including your blood vessels and circulatory system. Atrial fibrillation occurs when the two upper chambers of the heart (the atria) fail to beat in sync with the two lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart, causing an irregular heartbeat. As a result, this irregularity can pose a major risk for stroke and heart failure. Atrial fibrillation comes in three different forms: Occasional – The symptoms of occasional afib can come
Read More

Peripheral Angioplasty and Stenting

Peripheral angioplasty is a nonsurgical procedure used to widen or reopen narrowed or obstructed peripheral arteries or veins. Some of these angioplasty procedures will utilize stent (a small, wire mesh tube) placement as a supplemental treatment option that can be done during angioplasty. Benefits of angioplasty and stenting Peripheral angioplasty and stenting are procedures that can significantly reduce the risks associated with plaque buildup in the arteries and veins, especially in severe cases of atherosclerosis. These benefits can include: Decreasing signs and symptoms of blocked arteries and veins Significantly reducing chances of death or damage to the valves as the
Read More

Introducing the Zenith Fenestrated Graft

We’re thrilled to introduce you to the latest FDA-approved treatment technology for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA): the Zenith Fenestrated Graft. If you’re unaware of this condition, an AAA occurs when the walls of the abdominal portion of the aorta (the main blood vessel that delivers blood to your body) weaken and begin to bulge. Our new graft allows us to line the inner walls of the aorta to give the blood a new, reinforced path that doesn’t put pressure on the aneurysm and significantly reduces the risk of a rupture. The main benefit of the Zenith Fenestrated Graft is its
Read More

Understanding Thrombectomy and Embolectomy

Thrombectomy and embolectomy are life-saving procedures mostly performed in emergency situations. The terms embolectomy and thrombectomy are sometimes used interchangeably, but there are some differences between the two. To understand how a thrombectomy or embolectomy is performed, you must first understand why they are done. Sometimes, due to various factors like disease, blood clots can form in the blood vessels. A thrombus is usually a solid-mass stationary clot. An embolus is when part or all of that clot is dislodged and begins to travel through the circulatory system. Essentially, an embolus is a moving thrombus. These clots can pose serious
Read More

Understanding Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the lower part of the abdominal aorta becomes swollen and enlarged. In many cases, AAA will display no symptoms, making it a potentially dangerous condition if left untreated. The abdominal aorta is the largest artery, and it supplies oxygen-rich blood to the lower part of the body. If a weak area of the abdominal aorta expands or bulges, it can burst, causing severe internal bleeding and death. Immediate medical attention is crucial during this time. How serious is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The small or slower-growing aneurysms
Read More

Top 10 Heart-Healthy Foods

Many things can contribute to good vascular health, but a key factor is what you put into your body. The food you eat can greatly affect the way your heart works. Since your heart is one of the most important organs in your body, it’s best you feed it only the finest. Omega-3 Fatty Acids We all know that too much fat is bad for you, but there are good fats out there that your body needs. Omega-3s are polyunsaturated fats that help improve heart function. They regulate blood clotting, reduce cholesterol and blood pressure levels, and prevent inflammation. Omega-3s
Read More

The Facts About Carotid Artery Disease

The carotid arteries are the two large blood vessels that extend down your neck and provide necessary blood to the head and brain. Carotid artery disease begins when a buildup of plaque narrows the artery, causing a decrease of blood flow to the brain. The plaque initially has a wax-like consistency and can harden over time, making it hard for blood to run through the vessel. This hardened plaque can break off and cause clots, or travel to smaller arteries. The plaques can also buildup until there is a complete blockage in the artery. In either case, a stroke or
Read More

Don’t Take a Chance with Your Health: Attend Our Free Peripheral Artery Disease Screening on March 20th!

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is when large and medium-sized peripheral arteries — which supply blood to the head, organs and limbs — become narrow or clogged and restrict blood flow. PAD is dangerous and potentially deadly. Most often found in the legs, PAD is caused by the buildup of plaque (atherosclerosis). It can cause pain, disability, organ failure and other serious consequences to lifestyle and health — even death. Also, atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries is often accompanied by the same problem in the coronary arteries, which is heart disease. If you’re at risk, get screened for PAD! PAD on
Read More